Returning (again) to WordPress

Every few years I try to move my blog away from WordPress. I tried again earlier this year, but here I am back in WordPress before even a month has gone by! Basically, nothing is as conducive to writing for the web.

I love MediaWiki (which is what I shifted to this time; last time around it was Dokuwiki and for a brief period last year it was a wrapper for Pandoc that I’m calling markdownsite; there have been other systems too) but wikis really are general-purpose co-writing platforms, best for multiple users working on text that needs to be revised forever. Not random mutterings of that no one will ever read, let alone particularly need to edit on an on-going basis.

So WordPress it is, and it’s leading me to consider the various ‘streams’ of words that I use daily: email, photography, journal, calendar, and blog (I’ll not get into the horrendous topic of chat platforms). In the context of those streams, WordPress excels. So I’ll try it again, I think.

Editing MediaWiki pages in an external editor

I’ve been working on a MediaWiki gadget lately, for editing Wikisource authors’ metadata without leaving the author page. It’s fun working with and learning more about OOjs-UI, but it’s also a pain because gadget code is kept in Javascript pages in the MediaWiki namespace, and so every single time you want to change something it’s a matter of saving the whole page, then clicking ‘edit’ again, and scrolling back down to find the spot you were at. The other end of things—the re-loading of whatever test page is running the gadget—is annoying and slow enough, without having to do much the same thing at the source end too.

So I’ve added a feature to the ExternalArticles extension that allows a whole directory full of text files to be imported at once (namespaces are handled as subdirectories). More importantly, it also ‘watches’ the directories and every time a file is updated (i.e. with Ctrl-S in a text editor or IDE) it is re-imported. So this means I can have MediaWiki:Gadget-Author.js and MediaWiki:Gadget-Author.css open in PhpStorm, and just edit from there. I even have these files open inside a MediaWiki project and so autocompletion and documentation look-up works as usual for all the library code. It’s even quite a speedy set-up, luckily: I haven’t yet noticed having to wait at any time between saving some code, alt-tabbing to the browser, and hitting F5.

I dare say my bodged-together script has many flaws, but it’s working for me for now!

New feature for ia-upload

I have been working on an addition to the IA Upload tool these last few days, and it’s ready for testing. Hopefully we’ll merge it tomorrow or the next day.

This is the first time I’ve done much work with the internal structure of DjVu files, and really it’s all been pretty straight-forward. A couple of odd bits about matching element and page names up between things, but once that was sorted it all seems to be working as it should.

It’s a shame that the Internet Archive has discontinued their production of DjVu files, but I guess they’ve got their reasons, and it’s not like anyone’s ever heard of DjVu anyway. I don’t suppose anyone other than Wikisource was using those files. Thankfully they’re still producing the DjVu XML that we need to make our own DjVus, and it sounds like they’re going to continue doing so (because they use the XML to produce the text versions of items).

Abandoned code projects

One of the sad things about open source software is the process of working on some code, feeling like it’s going somewhere good and is useful to people, but then at some point having to abandon it. Normally just because life moves on and the higher-priority code always has to be the stuff that earns an income, or just that there are only so many slots for projects in my brain.

I feel this way about Tabulate, the WordPress plugin I was working on until a year ago, and about a few Dokuwiki plugins that I used to maintain. All were good fun to work on, and served reasonably useful places in some people’s websites. But I don’t have time, especially as it takes even more time & concentration to switch between completely separate codebases and communities — the latter especially. So these projects just languish, usually until some wonderful person comes along on Github and asks to take over as maintainer.

I am going to try to keep up with Tabulate, however. It doesn’t need that much work, and the WordPress ecosystem is a world that I actually find quite rewarding to inhabit (I know lots of people wouldn’t agree with that, and certainly there’s a commercial side to it that I find a bit tiring).

Not this morning, though, but maybe later this week… :-)

Wikisource Hangout

I wonder how long it takes after someone first starts editing a Wikimedia project that they figure out that they can read lots of Wikimedia news on https://en.planet.wikimedia.org/ — and when, after that, they realise they can also post to the news there? (At which point they probably give up if they haven’t already got a blog.)

Anyway, I forgot that I can post news, but then I remembered. So:

There’s going to be a Wikisource meeting next weekend (28 January, on Google Hangouts), if you’re interested in joining:
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikisource_Community_User_Group/January_2017_Hangout