New location for Apache PHP config

Under PHP 5, I used to put custom PHP configuration in a file such as /etc/php5/apache2/conf.d/99-foobar.ini and it’d be automatically included by the main php.ini (after most others, thanks to the 99).

Now in PHP 7, it seems to be more normal to add a custom module in /etc/php/7.2/mods-available/foobar.ini and enable it with phpenmod foobar. I guess there’s no priority-setting with this system?

Piwigo on Android

I’ve recently started using the Piwigo app (for Android). It’s getting good! Version 1.0.0 has just been released, and it has the thing that I’ve been wanting for ages: the ability to select multiple photos at once, to upload. Hoorah or what?

So I’ve got to get serious about organising my photo collection now, and make sure a) everything is in my Piwigo; and b) each photo is there only once. I might see if I can help with preventing duplicates at upload time.

Exactitude in wiki data modelling

There’s a new page on MediaWiki.org called Managing data in MediaWiki. It compares the Wikibase, Semantic MediaWiki, and Cargo extensions. All three of these extensions are about managing the metadata of wiki pages or of concepts represented by those pages.

The thing I love about MediaWiki is that one can give in to the impulse to progressively, gradually, move towards being exact in the representation of data. Each of the above extensions help massively with this, but it’s still pretty easy to get confused about how to do it.

Embed Wikimedia 0.2.0

I’ve released another beta version of Embed Wikimedia, with support for three blocks for the WordPress block-editor (Commons, Wikipedia, and Wikidata). There’s still work to be done on their interfaces, but before tackling that I want to sort out support for captions from Structured Data on Commons. There’s a few other bugs too (and I’m sure I’ll write more before I’m done).

The annoying thing about blocks, I’m finding, is that I still write a fair bit with the Android WordPress editor, and so still do old-fashioned embeds where they’re just a bare URL on its own line. I feel like the blocks get away from that simplicity (although, internally, so far they’re exactly the same functionality).

Cycle to Perth

I cycled to Perth yesterday, mainly as a way to stop thinking about things. I didn’t really think there would be any OSM mapping to be done on such a popular route, and there wouldn’t have been if it weren’t for the roadworks along the freeway

End of the cycle-path, thanks to roadworks
End of the cycle-path, thanks to roadworks (2019-08-17)

which forced me to cross over the overpass and ride through the streets of South Perth. The official detour ended and I could have crossed back, but I carried on… through non-cyclepaths and large detours around intersections.

Footpath to the Old Mill in South Perth
Footpath to the Old Mill in South Perth (2019-08-17)

I looked at the map, and it did actually look like there was a whole path along the golf course that wasn’t on the map, but actually it was added a month ago and OSMand hasn’t updated yet.

But it was interesting to see the new timber shingles being put on the Old Mill.

2019-08-17_The_Old_Mill,_roof_renovations_1.jpg
New shingles being installed on the Old Mill, South Perth. — 2019-08-17 The Old Mill, roof renovations 1.jpg (17 August 2019, 13:47:05) by Samwilson, CC-BY-SA-4.0.

DDD Perth 2019

On Saturday I went to my second DDD Perth conference. This is an annual one-day event that seems to bill itself as being something different from the usual tech conference and to be more accessible to people who might not normally go to these things. Which, I reckon, is pretty great; it feels like a more friendly place (even though I am the sort of person who usually goes to these sorts of things). There is something of a corporate vibe, though, which sort of mars the ‘community’ aspect — although that’s where the low price of the tickets comes from, so I shouldn’t complain!

The welcome to country was done by Nick Abraham, who gave an interesting talk. I liked the lists that he rattled off the names of families he’s part of and places they’re from.

All of the presentations that I went to were interesting, but the two that have stuck with me were about CSS Grid (Amy Kapernick), and WebAuthn (Ben Lowry). I want to experiment with both in my personal projects. Don’t suppose I’ll do so, though. (Too many fun things to explore; not enough time.)

I’m very glad that the Perth developer community is able to support this sort of event these days.