Publishing on the indiweb

I’ve been reading about POSSE and PESOS, and getting re-inspired about the value in a plurality of web tools. I sometimes try to focus just on one Software package (MediaWiki, at the moment, because it’s what I code fornear at work. But I used to love working on WordPress, and I’ve got a couple of stalled projects for Piwigo lying around. Basically, all these things will be of higher quality if they have to work with each other and with all the data silos (Facebook, Twitter, etc.).

The foundational principles of the IndiWeb are:

  1. Own your data.
  2. Use visible data for humans first, machines second. See also DRY.
  3. Build tools for yourself, not for all of your friends. It’s extremely hard to fight Metcalfe’s law: you won’t be able to convince all your friends to join the independent web. But if you build something that satisfies your own needs, but is backwards compatible for people who haven’t joined in (say, by practicing POSSE), the time and effort you’ve spent building your own tools isn’t wasted just because others haven’t joined in yet.
  4. Eat your own dogfood. Whatever you build should be for yourself. If you aren’t depending on it, why should anybody else? We call that selfdogfooding. More importantly, build the indieweb around your needs. If you design tools for some hypothetical user, they may not actually exist; if you build tools for yourself, you actually do exist. selfdogfooding is also a form of “proof of work” to help focus on productive interactions.
  5. Document your stuff. You’ve built a place to speak your mind, use it to document your processes, ideas, designs and code. At least document it for your future self.
  6. Open source your stuff! You don’t have to, of course, but if you like the existence of the indie web, making your code open source means other people can get on the indie web quicker and easier.
  7. UX and design is more important than protocols, formats, data models, schema etc. We focus on UX first, and then as we figure that out we build/develop/subset the absolutely simplest, easiest, and most minimal protocols & formats sufficient to support that UX, and nothing more. AKA UX before plumbing.
  8. Build platform agnostic platforms. The more your code is modular and composed of pieces you can swap out, the less dependent you are on a particular device, UI, templating language, API, backend language, storage model, database, platform. The more your code is modular, the greater the chance that at least some of it can and will be re-used, improved, which you can then reincorporate.
  9. Longevity. Build for the long web. If human society is able to preserve ancient papyrus, Victorian photographs and dinosaur bones, we should be able to build web technology that doesn’t require us to destroy everything we’ve done every few years in the name of progress.
  10. Plurality. With IndieWebCamp we’ve specifically chosen to encourage and embrace a diversity of approaches & implementations. This background makes the IndieWeb stronger and more resilient than any one (often monoculture) approach.
  11. Have fun. Remember that GeoCities page you built back in the mid-90s? The one with the Java applets, garish green background and seventeen animated GIFs? It may have been ugly, badly coded and sucky, but it was fun, damnit. Keep the web weird and interesting.

Wikipedia workshop this weekend

There will be a workshop at the State Library of Western Australia this Saturday from 1 p.m., for anyone to come along and learn how to add just one citation to just one Wikipedia article (or more of either, of course). For more details, see meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/WikiClubWest.

Lenovo ThinkPad Carbon X1 (gen. 5)

Five years, two months, and 22 days after the last time, I’m retiring my laptop and moving to a new one. This time it’s a Lenovo ThinkPad Carbon X1, fifth generation (manufactured in March this year, if the packaging is to be believed). This time, I’m not switching operating systems (although I am switching desktop’s, to KDE, because I hear Ubuntu is going all-out normal Gnome sometime soon).

So I kicked off the download of kubuntu-16.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso and while it was going started up the new machine. I jumped straight into bios to set the boot order (putting ‘Windows boot manager’ right at the bottom because it sounds like something predictably annoying), and hit ‘save’. Then I forgot what I was doing and wondered back to my other machine, leaving the new laptop to reboot and send itself into the Windows installation process. Oops.

There’s no way out! You select the language you want to use, and then are presented with the EULA—with a but ‘accept’ button, but no way to decline the bloody thing, and no way to restart the computer! Even worse, a long-press on the power button just suspended the machine, rather than force-booting it. In the end some combination of pressing on the power button while waking from suspend tricked it into dying. Then it was a simple matter of booting from a thumb drive and getting Kubuntu installed.

I got slightly confused at two points: at having to turn off UEFI (which I think is the ‘Windows boot manager’ from above?) in order to install 3rd party proprietary drivers (usually Lenovo are good at providing Linux drivers, but more on that later); and having to use LVM in order to have full-disk encryption (because I had thought that it was usually possible to encrypt without LVM, but really I don’t mind either way; there doesn’t seem to be any disadvantage to using LVM; I then of course elected to not encrypt my home directory).

So now I’m slowly getting KDE set up how I like it, and am running into various problems with the trackpoint, touchpad, and Kmail crashing. I’ll try to document the more interesting bits here, or add to the KDE UserBase wiki.