Flickr to reduce their free plan to 1000 photos

I’m pleased to see Flickr is going do away with their massive free storage:

Beginning January 8, 2019, Free accounts will be limited to 1,000 photos and videos. If you need unlimited storage, you’ll need to upgrade to Flickr Pro.

This is annoying for people who rely on it, but if a service is good then it’s worth paying for.

That said, and even though I do have a paid Flickr account, I think I’m going to stick to using my own Piwigo installation from now on.

On not hosting everything

I’ve been moving all my photos to Flickr lately. It’s been a long process, one complicated by the fact that it seems silly to run my own WordPress installation (and things like ArchivesWiki) if I’m not going to bother hosting everything myself. Of course, that’s not really very logical, and so I’ve decided that it’s perfectly okay to host photos on Flickr, videos on YouTube, and all the text (and miscellaneous) stuff here on my own server.

Adding data, not systems

For the most part, and leaving aside some tool-making or data-checking programming, I think it is far more relaxing to add data to the world than to add more systems-for-working-with-data. Contributing to Wikisource, Openstreetmap, Commons, even Flickr and Reddit, will further the cause (what ’cause’?) more than building some new system for cataloguing photos or conducting conversations.

So take photos, draw maps, write blog posts, explore the world and record what you see. Don’t devise the means to do these things — we already have the means, and have had for a rather long time. Better to get on and do it, I think. The means won’t be perfectly what you’d prefer, but then they never will be (even after you’ve built the system that’s perfectly exactly what you want).

If you see what I mean?

Anyway, I’m only saying this because I’m going to be away from regular coding for a few months from next week, so shall be focussing on Doing more than Building. And I can’t wait!

What can I put on Commons?

A strange log, completely devoured by worms. One wonders how it go where it is.

I never quite know what to upload to Wikimedia Commons. They say it accepts files that provide knowledge and are instructional or informative, but that seems so broad. Can I, for example, upload the photo above? It’s just a log that I thought was interesting because it’s so worm-eaten, and so neatly cut at each end (and the further end has two S-shaped steel hooks embedded in it), but it it within the scope of Commons? I’ve no idea. I suspect that it’s not, because it’s not a very good photo and it’s not of interest to anyone other than me. I could upload it, and it might stay there for a while, but surely someone will come along at some point — perhaps years down the track, when I’m no longer interested in it — and do away with it?

So I figure I’m better off uploading it here, where it can stay and be safely ignored by the world. I do just wonder, though, whether much the same line of reasoning can be used for very many photos that might be suitable for Commons. Actually, I don’t wonder it: I do not upload much there because I think what I’ve got to offer really does mostly fall into the same category as this log photo.

So I’ll stick to my own wiki, for now. Plenty of work for me on Wikisource, anyway…

FreoWiki is go! (Or GoFreo is a wiki?)

We had a great gathering last night at Little Creatures to talk about FreoWiki (including what to call it; one suggestion is GoFreo). Some topics…

  • It’s all set up and good to go, at http://freo.org.au/;
  • The site overall is licenced under CC Attribution 2.5 Australia, but people can put whatever licences they want on individual pages or media;
  • Some ideas are being bounced around about alternatives to FreoWiki as a name;
  • The Fremantle Herald might be interested in adding their archival content to FreoWiki—at the moment they’re only keeping the four most recent editions on their site, and we could host a complete archive;
  • Personal, first-person content is desirable: people’s recollections of Fremantle, or visions for its future;
  • The entry page needs to look good, and (visually) convey what it’s all about;
  • We’ll make cards to hand out to people, with some small bit of info about FreoWiki, and a URL with a blank after it (i.e. freo.org.au/_____________) in which we can write the name of the page that we’re suggesting people use; e.g. to a business owner, with the name of their business (then we scurry home and quickly add some content to that page);
  • Good thought needs to be given to ways of ensuring longevity of the project (if it takes off), both technical (backups etc.) and organisational;
  • We should enable using media from Commons (already done);
  • Plus lots of other stuff that I can’t right now remember!

So now it’s time to start adding content! :-) The easy bit, really.

Cantonment Hill and Wikimedia Commons

The news that Flickr Commons is full prompted me, yesterday afternoon, to cycle down to Cantonment Hill to get some photos to add to the hill’s Wikipedia article. Why? Because I added a short note to Wikinews the other day about the imminent return of the hill to the FCC; and because I was reminded that Commons is a place — the place, perhaps, now — to put photos that might be of use or interest to other people, and I like that ‘collective archive’ idea.

I have always felt that Commons only wants files that are of direct use in another project — mainly Wikipedia — and that unless one can think of a good reason to upload a file, that file should be posted elsewhere. Such as Flickr Commons, or the Internet Archive; I can’t think of anywhere else. Perhaps I’m wrong. Is Commons more like the IA than one might first think? Is it acceptable to add material that is highly unlikely to ever make it in to a ‘proper’ article on one of the projects? Unless there is a need to illustrate, for example, the various types of steel handrails used on stairs in the 1950s, then there are some photos that will never make it out of Commons. That’s okay though. Someone might want to write that article in fifty years’ time.

So I am going to keep working on Wikimedia projects, in my own way, in the hope that it is a worthwhile use of my time. I think it is.

My Sandstone University

Well, look here, I really can’t think very well at this time of night, so I don’t think you should expect much of this post.

I’m thinking of that cave just up from the Palm Tree Beach, the one who’s main enterance caved in a few years ago, leaving only the other more convoluted way in. It’s a nice cave, but the beach in front is more where I’m at. If that makes sense. The reeds and the sand, the memories of ignoring that bit and running past, along the path, to get to Never’s or Fragle. That’s what I’m getting at. The sun, and bleeding (but not caring) from climbing back up the cliff.

Of taking one of the school’s Spotmatics down there, and a tripod, and taking (crap) photos of bits of rock and thinking them oh-so-representitive of Blackwall Reach. Then the photography teacher thinking that they were, and thus being dis-illusioned at the photography teacher’s skill in judging photos…

So, this little beach, and photographs across the river to the old sugar refinery. It’s just about a Place, and a damned solid, viceral connection (at some point in time). So why on Earth is this coming up now? No reason, beyond being just a little squiffy, and that I’d like to be back there one day.

At least, as the winter closes in here in Canberra, I’d like to be back there.

Relying on, but not trusting, technology

I have been sorting through my (digital) photos lately, uploading the good ones to my website. It’s drudge-work, peaceful in its way like all drudge-work, and now and then I stumble upon a particularly nice shot, or one that evokes some pleasant memory, and so I don’t mind doing it. My idea is that this little computer is likely to one day get broken or stolen, and I don’t want to lose everything.

I’m also doing it becuase I’m keen to have fewer belongings, and boxes of photos and old journals are something of a weight (literally and figuratively, obviously). I want to simplify. A bag and a box and a backpack. A computer, three books, and a hat. Hip flask, pen, and waterbottle. Although I’m never going to get rid of my Waterman or Moleskine, I’m coming to the computer to vent that creative energy that in a more perfect world would probably be put into woodwork — and at least I don’t end up with a chair to carry with me from house to house.

It’s not that I think of the Internet as ‘simple’, or even particularly reliable. I don’t. I quite understand its utter complexity and reliance on most of the most unsustainable things in the modern world. And I don’t like that. I’d much rather have a little stone hut and a few chickens.

But here I am, in Canberra, studying I.T. I do rely on the Internet, and I’m going to continue to upload my photos and writing, and just not worry about it. I might print a few things, if I really care about them, but at the end of the day if the Internet stops I’ll be far too busy planting gardens on the freeways to worry about losing a few photos.