Piwigo on Android

I’ve recently started using the Piwigo app (for Android). It’s getting good! Version 1.0.0 has just been released, and it has the thing that I’ve been wanting for ages: the ability to select multiple photos at once, to upload. Hoorah or what?

So I’ve got to get serious about organising my photo collection now, and make sure a) everything is in my Piwigo; and b) each photo is there only once. I might see if I can help with preventing duplicates at upload time.

Piwigo Embeds (for WordPress)

Here’s my first draft at making Piwigo sites embeddable in WordPress: github.com/samwilson/piwigo-embeds

‘Embed’ here is what WordPress calls the ability to add a URL of a site on its own line in a post or page, and for a nice rendering of the site at that URL to be provided automatically. It works with core WordPress with sites like Youtube and Flickr, and somewhat for random other sites if they provide the right metadata. Piwigo does not yet provide particularly rich metadata (there are some ideas to do so, though), but anyway it’s nicer to be able to do something more complicated that uses the Piwigo API.

As a first hack at this, my plugin just shows the medium-sized image, with title below and description as the tooltip, and the image linked to the page on the Piwigo site. I plan on introducing caching, and perhaps some nicer display (dates, comment count, etc.). Ideas welcome!

On not hosting everything

I’ve been moving all my photos to Flickr lately. It’s been a long process, one complicated by the fact that it seems silly to run my own WordPress installation (and things like ArchivesWiki) if I’m not going to bother hosting everything myself. Of course, that’s not really very logical, and so I’ve decided that it’s perfectly okay to host photos on Flickr, videos on YouTube, and all the text (and miscellaneous) stuff here on my own server.

Manually upgrading Piwigo

There’s a new version of Piwigo out, and so I must upgrade. However, I’ve got things installed so that the web server doesn’t have write-access to the application files (as a security measure), and so I can’t use the built-in automatic upgrader.

I decided to switch to using Git to update the files, to make future upgrades much easier and without having to make anything writable by the server (even for some short amount of time).

First lock the site, via Tools > Maintenance -> Lock gallery, then get the new code:

$ git clone https://github.com/Piwigo/Piwigo.git photos.samwilson.id.au
$ cd photos.samwilson.id.au
$ git checkout 2.8.3

Copy the following files:

/upload and /galleries (these are symlinks on my system)
/local/config/database.inc.php
/local/config/config.inc.php

The following directories must be writable by the web server: /_data and /upload (including /upload/buffer; I was getting an “error during buffer directory creation” error).

Then browse to /upgrade.php to run any required database changes.

I’ve installed these plugins using Git as well: Piwigo-BatchDownloader, Flickr2Piwigo, and piwigo-openstreetmap. The OSM plugin also requires /osmmap.php to be created with the following (the plugin would have created it if it was allowed):

<?php
define( 'PHPWG_ROOT_PATH', './' );
include_once( PHPWG_ROOT_PATH . 'plugins/piwigo-openstreetmap/osmmap.php' );
?>

That’s about. Maybe these notes will help me remember next time.

Piwigo rocks

I have been using Piwigo for a couple of years (photos.samwilson.id.au), and have been really happy with it. The ability to work with large numbers of photos (uploading lots, and bulk-editing) is what made it a pleasure to use to start with; these are usually the initial tasks one does with this photo-gallery software, and they’re usually where systems are not at their best. Now I’ve got a few thousand photos in it, I’ve gotten the hang of a reasonable workflow, and Piwigo has mostly receeded to the background and just carries on working without issue. I’ve added my albums’ URLs to all sorts of places, including in printed archival descriptions, and feel pretty committed to sticking with Piwigo.

So it was nice to recieve a newsletter from the Piwigo development team, talking about their recent shift of the codebase to GitHub, a new Java desktop synchronisation client, and other things. If one doesn’t actively haunt the forums, it’s hard to remember that Piwigo is still a going concern — but I’m very glad that it is!

Open source software is great, I love using it and contributing to it. But sometimes it goes away. :( Of course, that happens to proprietary apps too, but with FOSS failures I feel sad, because it feels like I’ve personally failed the project (I should’ve been more involved). It’s one of the reasons it’s good to pay for free software. I’m glad Piwigo makes money from their piwigo.com service (well, I assume that’s what keeps the lights on).

Anyway, all I wanted to say was: thanks for Piwigo.