Manually upgrading Piwigo

There’s a new version of Piwigo out, and so I must upgrade. However, I’ve got things installed so that the web server doesn’t have write-access to the application files (as a security measure), and so I can’t use the built-in automatic upgrader.

I decided to switch to using Git to update the files, to make future upgrades much easier and without having to make anything writable by the server (even for some short amount of time).

First lock the site, via Tools > Maintenance -> Lock gallery, then get the new code:

$ git clone https://github.com/Piwigo/Piwigo.git photos.samwilson.id.au
$ cd photos.samwilson.id.au
$ git checkout 2.8.3

Copy the following files:

/upload (this is a symlink on my system)
/local/config/database.inc.php
/local/config/config.inc.php

The following directories must be writable by the web server: /_data and /upload (including /upload/buffer; I was getting an “error during buffer directory creation” error).

Then browse to /upgrade.php to run any required database changes.

I’ve installed these plugins using Git as well: Piwigo-BatchDownloader, Flickr2Piwigo, and piwigo-openstreetmap. The OSM plugin also requires /osmmap.php to be created with the following (the plugin would have created it if it was allowed):

<?php
define( 'PHPWG_ROOT_PATH', './' );
include_once( PHPWG_ROOT_PATH . 'plugins/piwigo-openstreetmap/osmmap.php' );
?>

That’s about. Maybe these notes will help me remember next time.

Piwigo rocks

I have been using Piwigo for a couple of years (photos.samwilson.id.au), and have been really happy with it. The ability to work with large numbers of photos (uploading lots, and bulk-editing) is what made it a pleasure to use to start with; these are usually the initial tasks one does with this photo-gallery software, and they’re usually where systems are not at their best. Now I’ve got a few thousand photos in it, I’ve gotten the hang of a reasonable workflow, and Piwigo has mostly receeded to the background and just carries on working without issue. I’ve added my albums’ URLs to all sorts of places, including in printed archival descriptions, and feel pretty committed to sticking with Piwigo.

So it was nice to recieve a newsletter from the Piwigo development team, talking about their recent shift of the codebase to GitHub, a new Java desktop synchronisation client, and other things. If one doesn’t actively haunt the forums, it’s hard to remember that Piwigo is still a going concern — but I’m very glad that it is!

Open source software is great, I love using it and contributing to it. But sometimes it goes away. :( Of course, that happens to proprietary apps too, but with FOSS failures I feel sad, because it feels like I’ve personally failed the project (I should’ve been more involved). It’s one of the reasons it’s good to pay for free software. I’m glad Piwigo makes money from their piwigo.com service (well, I assume that’s what keeps the lights on).

Anyway, all I wanted to say was: thanks for Piwigo.