Marking time

When the sun gets over the yardarm here (when it’s about level with the top of the Port Authority building), it gets into my eyes and I have to close the blind. So, does that mean it’s beer o’clock? Probably not, but it must surely be time to skive off on some nice code that makes sense and feels calmer and more testable? I reckon so.

Internet Archive 20th anniversary celebration

I can’t believe I’m going to miss this by two days! I’m going to be in San Francisco for the first time since 1997 for the week before. What are the odds.

HOW TO BUILD AN ARCHIVE--Banner

“For 20 years, the Internet Archive has been capturing the Web– that amazing universe of images, audio, text and software that forms our shared digital culture. Now it’s time to celebrate and we’re throwing a party! Please join us for our 20th Anniversary celebration on Wednesday, October 26th, 2016, from 5-9:30 pm.”

My dream job

So I’ve started a new job: I’m now working for the Wikimedia Foundation in the Community Tech team. It’s really quite amazing, actually: I go to “work” and do things that I really quite like doing and would be attempting to find time to do anyway if I were employed elsewhere. Not that I’m really into the swing of things yet—only two weeks in—but so far it’s pretty great.

I’m really excited about being part of an organisation that actually means something.

Imagine a world in which every single human being can freely share in the sum of all knowledge. That’s our commitment.

It’s a bit cheesy to quote that I know, but still: how nice it is to think that there’s something higher up the orgchart than an ever-increasing concentration of money.

Puerto Pollensa

Nearly time to leave Puerto Pollensa, heading to Palma (via Lluc). Heading into the grey day, that is. So much sun and warmth the last few days, and now it’s looking to be a bit drizzly. Actually, I’m quite happy; it’s much nicer walking in this sort of weather.

[osm_map_v3 map_center=”39.899,3.065″ zoom=”12″ width=”100%” height=”300″ ]

The view from Apartmentos Don Miguel

Balearia

Absolutely flat crossing this morning. Looking out the window the railing is precisely parallel with the horizon, the ship seems to not even really be moving. I’d still be hanging over the side watching Menorca disappear but it’s too chilly in the wind; nicer inside with cafe americana and this comfy chair with a nice view.

Installing AtoM

Access to Memory is a brilliant archival description management system, written in PHP and available under the CC-BY-SA license. The installation documentation is thorough… but of course I just want to get the thing running and so didn’t bother actually reading it all! I mean, where’s the tldr?!

So here are the essential bits (for a more-or-less bog standard Ubuntu install with Apache, PHP, and Node.js), running as a normal user and installing to a subdirectory.

To start, clone the repository from https://github.com/artefactual/atom.git and check out the latest stable branch (e.g. stable/2.2.x).

Then make the config, cache, and log directories writable by the web-server user: chgrp -R www-data {cache,log,data} (or whatever your webserver runs as, of course).

Now change into the /plugins/arDominionPlugin directory and run make; this will build the CSS files.

Navigating to the installation now will redirect to the installation system, and probably throw up a bunch of errors. Probably to do with missing dependencies, or permissions; sort these out (e.g. sudo php5enmod xsl and you should be good to go.

(Good to go to the next step, that is.)

Now install Elasticsearch. It’s easier than the AtoM docs admit: just do it the normal way with sudo apt-get install elasticsearch. (I’d submit a change to the AtoM docs to remove the “it’s not in the Ubuntu repositories” line, but I’m not quite sure how yet.)

Start Elasticsearch (in the background; the -d switch) with sudox /usr/share/elasticsearch/bin/elasticsearch -d and carry on with the installation procedure. The rest seems to be fairly straight forward.